A Land Acknowledgement serves to name the Native peoples who through political structures, war, or other exploitation suffered hardship and were made to be invisible. It helps us to respect the ongoing presence of tribal peoples in our communities and the debt of gratitude we owe them.

Land Acknowledgement – Marywood Campus

We, Dominican Sisters~Grand Rapids, acknowledge this Marywood Campus as gift of the Great Spirit’s creation and the ancestral home of the Odawa, Ojibwe (also known as Chippewa), and Bodewadmi tribal peoples* of the Three Fires Confederacy.

These indigenous tribes began a journey to the Great Lakes region from the Atlantic seaboard nearly a thousand years ago. For generations before settlers came, they lived, built a relationship to the earth, and cared for creation’s gift on this land we now know as Michigan. In the 1800’s almost all land acres were taken from the indigenous peoples through treaty, broken promises, and forced removal.

We lament the violence caused by past actions of encampment and displacement. We apologize for these wrongs and prayerfully support and value Native American peoples and their homeland. We desire to build a relationship with the indigenous people in our community. We benefit from the sacred presence, beauty, and sounds of nature found here. We are grateful to pray, study, minister, and live in community on this holy ground.

We strive to grow in awareness of our debt to native peoples.

* Names now in common usage are Ottawa, Ojibway and Potawatomi

 

What is a “Land Acknowledgement”?

A Land Acknowledgement is a formal statement given at the beginning of organized events or celebrations which recognizes the Indigenous people who built a sacred relationship with the earth in this place before settlers colonized the land. It serves to name the Native peoples who through political structures, war, or other exploitation suffered hardship and were made to be invisible. It helps us to respect the ongoing presence of tribal peoples in our communities and the debt of gratitude we owe them.

Who may use a “Land Acknowledgement”?

Anyone speaking or meeting on the Marywood Campus is encouraged to use the Land Acknowledgement at the start of a program. The Abbreviated Land Acknowledgement may be used at the end of an e-mail by a writer working “on this land”.